Profiles and Retires

[retired]

Dr. Hal L. Black

Dr. Hal L. BlackProfessor Hal Black earned his B.S. and M.S. at the University of Utah, working with mammalogist Stephen Durrant. His Ph.D. is from the University of New Mexico. After teaching two years at the University of Zambia, he came to BYU in 1975 to teach in the Multicultural Education Program, transferring later into the Department of Zoology and Entomology. He is retiring from the Department of Plant and Wildlife Sciences.
Dr. Hal L. Black
Dr. Black loves to share his natural history knowledge with elementary students.

Although he taught an array of subjects from general biology to nature appreciation to mammalogy, he most enjoys sharing his knowledge of natural history with his "elementary education teaching majors, with the prospect that they will share it with thousands of young students." His research on Navajo sheep dogs reaches thousands of students through the Weekly Reader. In that research, he demonstrates that any dog, raised properly, can be an excellent sheep dog. He has also researched bat ecology. His current research centers on the black bear. Finally, he conducts one of the longest running and continuously funded projects in the history of the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources.

Dr. Black and his wife Diana have three children. They recently purchased a new tractor and plan to expand the family farm they use to teach neighborhood children the fundamentals of gardening. He will teach one-quarter time this year in the Biology Department and hopes to spend more time at elementary schools with "Show and Tell" experiences. "There may be some time left over to look for that big buck during deer hunting season," he says.


[retired]

Dr. Susan Cockayne

Dr. Susan Cockayne

Professor Susan Cockayne began teaching at BYU in 1982 after three years at the University of Utah. She served as the coordinator of the College Biology 130 and Microbiology 130 courses. She also taught related courses in the Microbiology and Molecular Biology Department (MMBio), including courses in general microbiology and medical microbiology.

A Teaching Professor, she received the Karl G. Maeser Professional Faculty Excellence (2006), the College Outstanding Advisor (2004), the Alcuin Fellow (1999), and the College Teaching Excellence (1994) awards. She is one of two faculty in the Clinical Laboratory Science (CLS) Program, accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences. Her assignments have included teaching Clinical Chemistry with a laboratory, Clinical Microbiology with a lab
Dr. Shauna C. Anderson and Dr. Susan Cockayne
Dr. Cockayne, shown with Dr. Shauna C. Anderson (LEFT) at a recent commencement ceremony, has won numerous awards for teaching excellence.
oratory, and an introductory laboratory course, as well as coordinating the 24-week clinical training in six affiliated hospitals.

In 1997, Dr. Cockayne served on the University Professional Tenure and Rank Advancement Committee. She also served two terms as secretary of the Faculty Women's Association and three terms as secretary of BYU's Phi Kappa Phi chapter. Dr. Cockayne has been active at all levels in the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science and was a member of the program committee of the Clinical Laboratory Educator's national meeting in 2000.

She will continue to assist MMBio with its teaching needs during the next two semesters. Dr. Cockayne also serves as Relief Society President in her ward and plans to do some traveling in the days ahead.


[retired]

Dr. Kay B. Franz

Dr. Kay B. Franz
Dr. Kay Franz received her B.S. and Ph.D. in nutrition from the University of California, Berkeley and an M.S. from BYU. She did research at the University of California, Davis, the University of Washington Medical School, and the Harvard School of Public Health prior to joining BYU's Department of Food and Nutrition in 1968. During the 1970s, she developed nutrition education material for Western Samoa and Bolivia and worked with BYU students in Mexican villages. With Oak Ridge National Laboratory, she developed nutritional survival guidelines that became the basis of the church's food storage guidelines for many years.

Among many awards, Dr. Franz received the Seeli
Mildred Seelig and Dr. Kay B. Franz
Mildred Seelig (LEFT) and Dr. Franz at the 10th International Magnesium Symposium in Cairns, Australia.
g Magnesium Award, recognizing her magnesium research; the Karl G. Maeser Distinguished Teaching Award; and the College of Biology and Agriculture College Professorship. She has also been involved in many professional organizations and currently serves as President of the American College of Nutrition. For 19 years, she chaired the BYU Women in Science Center that promoted and supported women students in science careers. She also helped develop Freshman Academy.

A prolific reader, Dr. Franz stays abreast of current nutrition research and theory and incorporates the latest information into her teaching. She plans to continue teaching part-time this year then focus on publishing research she was unable to write-up before retirement. She loves to garden and will work to maintain her beautiful home and yard.



[retired]


Dr. Bruce H. Wooley

Dr. Bruce H. Wooley

Dr. Bruce Woolley earned his Pharm.D. from the University of Southern California in 1972 and came to BYU in 1977 to serve as director of the Student Health Center. As such, he helped found Collegium Aesculapium, an organization of Latter- day Saint health-care professionals. Working through that organization and the Ezra Taft Benson Agriculture and Food Institute, he helped establish the CUNORI College of Medicine and Surgery in Guatemala, which named him a Distinguished Fellow in 2006. He is currently the editor-in-chief and publisher of the Journal of Collegium Aesculapium.
Dr. Bruce H. Wooley giving a class
Dr. Woolley will continue to teach pharmacology classes even in retirement. Here he is teaching Physiology of Drug Mechanisms.
An Executive Committee member of the LDS Church Medical Advisory Committee, Dr. Woolley travels the world to improve the health
of LDS missionaries. He has also served the university as director of the Drug Abuse Prevention and Education Office and of athletic drug testing. As Vice-Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the University of Southern Nevada, he has been instrumental in BYU graduates being accepted to its pharmacy school.

He joined the Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology in 2002. In 2006, he received the College's Outstanding Citizenship and the
Department Distinguished Faculty awards. Dr. Woolley and his wife Annette have four children and 15 grandchildren. In retirement, he plans to expand his role in missionary health and remain on the board of trustees of the University of Southern Nevada. He will continue to edit the Journal of Collegium Aesculapium. In his spare time, he hopes to play more golf and catch more fish