Life Sciences Building Dedication

“Speak to the earth, and it shall teach thee.” - Job 12:8

By Estée Crenshaw

President Kevin J Worthen, Elder Russell M. Nelson, Sister Wendy Watson Nelson, Sandra Brown, and Dean Rodney J. Brown gather after the building dedication
President Kevin J Worthen, Elder Russell M. Nelson, Sister Wendy Watson Nelson, Sandra Brown,
and Dean Rodney J. Brown gather after the building dedication. Photo Credit: Mark A. Philbrick/BYU Photo.

The Life Sciences Building was dedicated on April 9, 2015 by Elder Russell M. Nelson, of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. “This is a very happy day,” said Elder Nelson.

During the dedication, Elder Nelson remarked on the blessings that come from obeying eternal laws. “Divine law is dependable; divine law is incontrovertible,” he said. “When the laws of God are obeyed, wanted blessings will always result.”

In speaking of his own time in the sciences as a heart surgeon, Elder Nelson stated: “The great privilege of studying God’s creations, builds in its students a reverence for life and a testimony that we are literally created by deity.”

Elder Nelson stated, “I think that a person can learn more by studying God’s creations than by studying the works of people.” He also stressed that, “There will always be more to learn.”

President Kevin J Worthen spoke of the progress that has been made in the College of Life Sciences. “Look where we are now,” he said. “This building is a tangible and very large reminder that we really have come a long way in life sciences in the last sixty years.” This progress can be attributed to many individuals, including John A. Widtsoe, whose namesake building is being torn down this summer. “Widtsoe spent only two years at BYU as a professor,” said President Worthen. “But his impact was tremendous.”

The dedication of the Life Sciences Building was a beautiful reminder of the progress the College of Life Sciences has made over the years and a commitment to prepare future scientists for advancements yet to come.