Noteworthy

By Jessica Romrell

New Leadership

Dr. Laura C. Bridgewater

Dr. Laura C. Bridgewater

Dr. Laura C. Bridgewater was named Associate Dean, effective June 1, 2016. Dr. Bridgewater earned her bachelor’s degree in microbiology from BYU. She received a doctorate in genetics from George Washington University, and then worked at the world-renowned M.D. Anderson Cancer Center as a postdoctoral fellow. Bridgewater returned to BYU in 1999, and began research that revealed specific mechanisms that control cartilage osteoarthritis genes, as well as a new class of bone morphogenetic protein that is localized in the nucleus of a cell. Professor Bridgewater has been widely published, with papers in prominent academic journals such as the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Nucleic Acids Research, Molecular Carcinogenesis, and Osteoarthritis and Cartilage. Undergraduate and graduate students in Bridgewater’s molecular biology research lab gain invaluable research experience, and virtually all of Professor Bridgewater’s publications acknowledge students as co-authors or lead authors.

Saying Goodbye

Earl Albee

Earl Albee

In 1966, Earl Albee began training that led to his management of the BYU-operated Rolling Hills Orchard in Emmett, Idaho. In 1968, Albee transferred to manage the East Sharon Stake Welfare Orchard, formerly located close to Provo Canyon. In 1971, he began working at BYU’s Agricultural Station in Spanish Fork, and by 1990 he became its manager. In 2000, Albee began a job on BYU campus caring for animals used in laboratory research. His duties included managing finances and supervising students in the husbandry, housing, and health care of the animals, about 80 percent of which were used by the College of Life Sciences. Albee’s expertise in the operation enabled hundreds of research projects to come to fruition. After almost 50 years of working for the Church and BYU, Albee retired on March 1, 2016.

Lora Beth Brown

Lora Beth Brown

Dr. Lora Beth Brown received a B.S. in home economics education from Iowa State University, an M.S. in foods from Cornell University, and a doctorate in secondary education from Brigham Young University. Prior to her employment at Brigham Young University in 1974, Dr. Brown was a community nutrition educator in South Texas, teaching nutrition to low income Latino families there and to migrant worker families throughout the Midwest. At BYU, she has encouraged thousands of undergraduate students to apply nutrition principles in their lives. In addition to her classroom teaching, she has mentored about 130 undergraduate college students and trained about 90 nutrition outreach workers in a variety of local and international internship locations, including Mexico, Guatemala, Bolivia, Ecuador, Ghana, Mongolia, Western Samoa, and Tonga. Throughout her entire career, Lora Beth’s focus has been to simplify complex nutrition information into practical and feasible recommendations for consumers.

Clark Brereton

Clark Brereton

For more than 30 years, Clark Brereton worked as the Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum’s construction specialist. Clark covered a multitude of complicated tasks and skillfully contributed to every aspect of the museum’s mission. Clark consistently reached out to and effectively supported the research collections, exhibits, and education functions of the museum. He had the uncanny ability to see challenging problems and then come up with remarkably simple and effective solutions. Clark’s exceptional service to the museum and the university was faithfully rendered; his hard work and unfailing commitment will always stand as a remarkable personal example of excellence.

R. Kent Crookston

R. Kent Crookston

As a BYU undergraduate in 1968 in agronomy—a branch of agriculture focused on crop production and soil management—Kent Crookston never dreamed that he would return to the campus 30 years later, much less as a dean. But after working as a professor and a department head at the University of Minnesota, Dr. Crookston became the dean of the BYU College of Biology & Agriculture (predecessor of the College of Life Sciences) in 1998. Serving as dean for seven years, he helped to streamline and reorganize the college to better meet the needs of 21st century students. In 2007, Dr. R. Kent Crookston became associate director of the BYU Faculty Center. His research led to dozens of publications and international conference presentations on how deans can work with problematic faculty members. Now Dr. Crookston has entered a new phase of life since he retired on January 1, 2016.

Nora Nyland Kerr

Nora Nyland Kerr

Dr. Nora Nyland Kerr received a B.A. in dietetics and a master’s degree in foodservice systems administration, both from BYU. She later earned her Ph.D. in institutional management from Kansas State University. Dr. Nyland Kerr was the director for the dietetics program at BYU since 1984. She was active in several professional organizations, including the Foodservice Systems Education Council, the Utah Dietetic Association, and the American Dietetic Association (now the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics). Of all her professional activities, Nora enjoyed teaching the most. She received BYU’s Karl G. Maeser Distinguished Teaching award, the Alumni Professorship award, and other teaching awards. She and her husband recently received a mission call to serve in the Oklahoma City mission.